Amazon Video, Netflix and the New TV Normal

Posted by on Apr 21, 2013 | 3 comments

The death of the traditional TV model has been forecast for many years now. I’ve always believed that the model needs to evolve and the rumors of its death have been greatly exaggerated. I think we are finally seeing the concrete manifestation of that evolution, and some of the early results are fascinating.

Since 2012, Netflix has been producing and releasing original series such as “Lilyhammer” and “House of Cards”, with the revival of “Arrested Development” in May 2013 marking their most high profile project to date. Now Amazon Instant Video is getting into the act, with an interesting twist. On April 19, Amazon released 14 pilots all at once, a mix of 8 comedies and 6 kids’ shows. With high profile names both in front of and behind the camera like John Goodman, Bebe Neuwirth and Jeffrey Tambor, to name just a few, Amazon is clearly trying to get your attention. But, have they? I’d be willing to bet this is the first you’re hearing of it.

The twist I mentioned comes from the viewers’ ability to answer a few survey questions about the pilots they just watched, giving the audience the chance to switch roles with the network suits and decide whether the show lives or dies. If you are an Amazon Prime member in the US or you get Lovefilm UK or Lovefilm Germany, all the shows are free, although there may be a way to get them for a fee if you are not a Prime member.

“The goal is to get customer feedback, to understand which ones customers are excited about and are promising,” said Amazon Studios head Roy Price. The studio was formed in November 2010, with a focus on crowd-sourced, high-quality TV and movie programming.

It is certainly debatable whether the audiences will be better judges of TV than suits, but this model does two things right away: 1) offers a value add to Prime members, as they will be the ones to receive this content for free and, 2) continues the “American Idol”/”The Voice” model of audience participation and control over content, but in a way that does not involve a contest.

I watched two of the shows (“Alpha House” and “Browsers”) and they were both fine. No better or worse than standard TV fare. “Browsers” was a comedy musical, so if musicals aren’t your thing, you might want to skip it, although Bebe Neuwirth’s song is hilarious and raunchy. I will probably wend my way through 3 or 4 more of the pilots that looked promising, as I am intrigued by Amazon’s model.

Two questions for you: 1- Had you heard about this effort from Amazon? 2- Do you ¬†like the idea of audiences giving input to the studio about a pilot? Does that make you more or less likely to watch it? (OK, that was sort of 3 questions…)

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3 Responses to “Amazon Video, Netflix and the New TV Normal”

  1. 1 First I’m hearing of Amazon’s efforts.
    2 I like the idea of viewer feedback on pilots.
    3 Their feedback would not make me more likely to watch. Most of the shows will continue to be trash, because the majority of the tv audiences enjoy trash.

  2. Congrats on being on the leading edge becuase yes this is the first I have heard which begs the question as to why amazon didn’t send out a general notice to all their ONLINE CUSTOMERS..like me. Didn’t even see a tweet or linked in notice from them. Odd. (Who is running there social media dept?)

    The feedback might make me watch depending on the quality of the reviews. Akin to Yelp for shows.Thanks for the post.

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